Hills & Dales

Hills & Dales

Aaah, the Peak District. Land of dry stone walls, deep limestone valleys, high desolate moorlands, picturesque villages, and more. A beautiful area for walking. Here's a selection of some of the best hills and dales for a Peak District walk.

 

Arbor Low

Arbor Low
Barely known outside of the Peak District, Arbor Low is is a Neolithic henge monument. It features a fallen circle of 50 white limestone slabs surrounding a central stone 'cove' - found only in major sacred sites. Entry is a £1 honesty box donation.

Arbor Low

Arbor Low stone circle

Alport Castles

Alport Castles
A stunning landslip on the southern flanks of Bleaklow, this is almost a ‘hidden’ part of the Peak District, located away from the more popular areas. The landslip is huge, bigger than the more famous one on Mam Tor.

Alport Castles

Alport Castles Walk

Bamford Edge

Bamford Edge
Bamford Edge sits just to the north east of the village of Bamford, perched above with brilliant views of the Hope Valley and the Derwent Reservoirs. Easy walking but with some steep drops on the edge itself. Can be a good spot for a cloud inversion!

Bamford Edge

Bamford Edge Walk

Black Hill

Black Hill
We love the moors of the Dark Peak. The name Black Hill is no longer reflective of its landscape, as thanks to Moors for the Future the area is blooming with mosses, wildflowers and heather. A desolate but beautiful part of the northern Peak District with some great walking.

Black Hill

Black Hill Walk

Burbage Edge

Burbage Edge
Wonderfully located, wonderful views, and wonderful easy walking. Burbage forms part of some great walks taking in some other nearby hills and dales.

Burbage Edge

Burbage Edge Walk

Chee Dale

Chee Dale
This limestone gorge is great for walks and is right in the middle of the Peak District. The path along the gorge takes in two sets of stepping stones can be submerged at times of heavy rain. It makes for a lovely, peaceful walk.

Chee Dale

Chee Dale Walk

Crook Hill

Crook Hill
The two peaks of Crook Hill are often missed by walkers in the Derwent Valley. They offer magnificent 360° views and the walking is easy either as a destination or to visit as part of a bigger walk.

Crook Hill

Crook Hill Walk

Dovedale / Thorpe Cloud

Dovedale / Thorpe Cloud
The volcano-esque mountain (in our eyes it is a mountain!) of Thorpe Cloud stands at the southern entrance to the ever popular Dovedale, complete with its famous stepping stones. Many people just walk up to the stones but there are many wonderful walks in this part of the Peak District.

Dovedale

Froggatt Edge / Curbar Edge

Froggatt Edge / Curbar Edge
This famous gritstone edge is one of 9 edges on the east of the national park. It’s an easy walk for much of its length, with some great views.

Froggatt Edge / Curbar Edge

Froggatt Edge Walk

Kinder Scout

Kinder Scout
The highest point in the Peak District, it’s a great area for walking with many different routes up to the 636m summit. Not a place for the inexperienced, in bad weather at least, but a fantastic moorland with many gritstone outcrops.

Kinder Scout

Kinder Scout Walk

Lathkill Dale

Lathkill Dale
There’s two distinctive parts to this wonderful valley; the western end dominated by craggy limestone rocks, and the eastern end which is more serene and wooded. A beautiful place with lovely villages nearby.

Lathkill Dale

Lathkill Dale

Lose Hill

Lose Hill
Another famous hill, standing proud with Win Hill guarding the entrance to Edale. It’s an accessible hill for walking but with steady ascents. You’re rewarded however with some of the best Peak District views.

Lose Hill

Lose Hill walk

Mam Tor

Mam Tor
One of the most famous hills in the Peak District, often thought to be the highest due to its commanding position over the Hope Valley. It stands at the western edge of the famous Great Ridge and is actually quite an easy walk depending on where you start.

Mam Tor

Mam Tor walk

Monsal Head

Monsal Head
A stunning viewpoint complete with viaduct, steep valley sides, a beautiful river, and lovely views. Not to be missed on any visit to the Peak District. Walks are varied and whatever your ability there's something for you to enjoy, including the Monsal Trail railway tunnels, now open for cycling and walking!

Monsal Head

Monsal Head walk

Mount Famine & South Head

Mount Famine & South Head
These are two lesser walked but prominent peaks not far from Chinley. They both offer outstanding views and are definitely worth visiting.

Mount Famine & South Head

Mount Famine & South Head walk

Robin Hood's Stride

Robin Hood's Stride
A jumble of gritstone, Robin Hood's Stride is near Birchover and a good place to visit with kids. Look out for the nearby Hermit's Cave as well.

Robin Hood's Stride

Robin Hood's Stride walk

Stanage Edge

Stanage Edge
A world famous gritstone edge, it's hugely popular with climbers and walkers but never seems to be too busy. Outstanding views, easy walks, great access; Stanage is a gem in the north east of the Peak District, on the edge of Sheffield.

Stanage Edge

Stanage Edge walk

Winnats Pass

Winnats Pass
An amazing steep limestone gorge just west of Castleton, Winnats makes for a great photo opportunity. Mix it with other walks in the Peak District for a great day out

Winnats Pass

Win Hill

Win Hill
A proper peak in the Peak District, Win Hill stands proud in the centre of the Hope Valley close to the famous Derwent Dam. There are numerous walks up to the top - some very steep, some more gentle - and the rocky summit is a bit of fun at the top!

Win Hill

Win Hill walk

Wolfescote Dale

Wolfescote Dale
One of the notable limestone dales of the Peak District, Wolfescote Dale is located at the northern end of the more famous Dovedale. It's a charming place for a walk, with craggy rocks and a serene, lazy river.

Wolfescote Dale